Visit London – Greenwich

You haven’t visited London if you haven’t been to Greenwich. Greenwich is full of History and is worth a visit. It can be reached by train from central London or by Uber Boats over the river Thames. Some places to visit are the Cutty Sark, the Greenwich Market, the Greenwich Park with the Royal Observatory, the National Marine Museum, the Queen’s House, the O2 Arena and much more.

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The Cutty Sark

The Cutty Sark

The Cutty Sark is a british clipper ship that was built in 1869 for the Jock Willis Shipping Line. The Cutty Sark was used for the tea trade. The Cutty Sark is the only intact survivor.

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Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,greenwich ,cutty sark
Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,greenwich ,cutty sark
Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,greenwich ,cutty sark

The Greenwich Market

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The Greenwich Market

The market is only a few steps away from the Cutty Sark, on the way to the National Marine Museum and the Royal Observatory. The present market dates from 1700 when a charter was signed by Lord Romney to run two markets , on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

The roof was added between 1902 and 1908 and replaced in 2016.

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Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,greenwich market,market

St Alfege Church

When leaving the market on Nelson Road, you will find the St Alfege Church. the Church is of medieval origin and was rebuilt in 1712-1714.

One of the notables burried here is the General James Wolfe who died in 1759. His statue is next to the Royal Observatory (photo further on this page).

The Greenwich Market

The Greenwich Market

The market is only a few steps away from the Cutty Sark, on the way to the National Marine Museum and the Royal Observatory. The present market dates from 1700 when a charter was signed by Lord Romney to run two markets , on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

The roof was added between 1902 and 1908 and replaced in 2016.

Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,greenwich market,market
Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,greenwich market,market
Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,greenwich market,market

St Alfege Church

When leaving the market on Nelson Road, you will find the St Alfege Church. the Church is of medieval origin and was rebuilt in 1712-1714.

One of the notables burried here is the General James Wolfe who died in 1759. His statue is next to the Royal Observatory (photo further on this page).

Greenwich Park

Royal Observatory

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A few steps away from the St Alfege Church and the Greenwich market you find the Greenwich Park with the National Marine Museum, the Royal Observatory and the Queen’s house.

Let’s first climb the hill up to the Royal Observatory.

The Royal Greenwich Observatory played a major role in the history of astronomy and navigation, and because the prime meridian passes through it, it gave its name to the Greenwich Mean time (GMT).

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Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,royal observatory,

Greenwich Time Ball

The time ball was installed in 1833. It serves to help mariners at the port and everybody else in the sight of the observatory to synchronise their clocks to GMT. The ball drops at precisely 1 pm every day. Until 1852 this was done by an operator, but was automised with an electric impulse from the Shepherd Master Clock from that year on.

The Shepherd Gate Clock

The Shepherd Gate Clock is just outside the Royal Greenwich Observatory and was constructed in 1852 by Charles Shepherd. The Gate Clock shows the GMT (no summer time)

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James Wolfe statue

The statue of James Wolfe, he was a Major General of the British Army. He leaded the British assault on Québec City in 1759.

His statue next to the Royal Observatory overlooks the Royal Naval College in Greenwich.

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Greenwich Park

Royal Observatory

A few steps away from the St Alfege Church and the Greenwich market you find the Greenwich Park with the National Marine Museum, the Royal Observatory and the Queen’s house.

Let’s first climb the hill up to the Royal Observatory.

Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,national marine museum,

The Royal Greenwich Observatory played a major role in the history of astronomy and navigation, and because the prime meridian passes through it, it gave its name to the Greenwich Mean time (GMT).

Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,royal observatory,

Greenwich Time Ball

The time ball was installed in 1833. It serves to help mariners at the port and everybody else in the sight of the observatory to synchronise their clocks to GMT. The ball drops at precisely 1 pm every day. Until 1852 this was done by an operator, but was automised with an electric impulse from the Shepherd Master Clock from that year on.

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The Shepherd Gate Clock

The Shepherd Gate Clock is just outside the Royal Greenwich Observatory and was constructed in 1852 by Charles Shepherd. The Gate Clock shows the GMT (no summer time)

Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,royal observatory,shephard clock

James Wolfe statue

The statue of James Wolfe, he was a Major General of the British Army. He leaded the British assault on Québec City in 1759.

His statue next to the Royal Observatory overlooks the Royal Naval College in Greenwich.

Philip Van Avermaet Photography,London,Travel,citytravel, Greenwich,National museum,visit london,royal observatory,,james wolfe,statue